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Research Newsletter-Fall/Winter 2007

DEVELOPMENTS

Scott Palmer
LPI Director of Development

For the Linus Pauling Institute, the past 18 months have been full of anniversaries and significant milestones. In 2006 we celebrated both the tenth anniversary of the Institute's move from Palo Alto, California, to Oregon State University and the twentieth anniversary of the publication of Dr. Pauling's international best seller, How to Live Longer and Feel Better. OSU Press reprinted the book last year, and the first printing has already sold out. A second printing is in the works.

This year marks Dr. Balz Frei's tenth anniversary as Director of the Institute, and in March of 2008 Dr. George Bailey, one of our original Principal Investigators and a Distinguished Professor at Oregon State University, will officially retire, concluding a remarkable scientific career in cancer chemoprevention. However, the construction of the Linus Pauling Science Center may be the most significant event in the history of the Linus Pauling Institute.

On October 26th, we celebrated the public announcement of OSU's first ever Capital Campaign and the centerpiece of the Campaign: the Linus Pauling Science Center. Raising money for the Center was a top priority for the $620 million University-wide Capital Campaign.

While many people have been involved with the effort to raise the funds for this project, it was the leadership and advocacy of Dr. Edward Ray, President of Oregon State University, coupled with the vision and generosity of the Wayne and Gladys Valley Foundation and Al and Pat Reser, along with a handful of other donors, that made this building possible.

As Dr. Frei noted in his column, now that we have secured the funding for the building, the Linus Pauling Institute is getting ready to launch a major new research initiative in healthy aging. The goal of this initiative is to help everyone achieve their maximum healthspan through optimum health—we want people to live better, not just longer. We know that micronutrients, diet, and lifestyle play a significant role in helping people age more gracefully, and through this new research initiative we want to find out exactly why.

Many different research organizations have a new-found focus on aging. Often that focus is disease specific; that is, the goal is to try and find a cure for an existing health condition associated with aging once it has manifested itself. LPI has the opportunity to do something different—further our knowledge of how and why we age at the cellular and molecular level to better understand how we can prevent the increased susceptibility to disease as we age.

However, to do that we need to build our program by recruiting new faculty and equipping new labs with modern equipment—all of which takes money. Our future success with this initiative will continue to rely heavily on our many donors and friends who have supported us in the past. For those that are interested in supporting our Healthy Aging Program, there will be many opportunities to participate, including:

  • Endowed chairs in healthy aging research
  • Professorships in healthy aging and neurodegenerative diseases
  • Fellowships to support graduate students
  • Gifts to purchase new equipment
  • Program support for research projects

Because the funding for the building itself is already in place, we have a unique opportunity to give special recognition to donors who support our Healthy Aging Program or any other research projects in LPI through a gift of $10,000 or more. Between now and the grand opening of the Center in 2010, individuals or corporations at that level will be recognized on a plaque in the new building. Donors who give $25,000 to LPI will have the opportunity to name a room in the new Center. Naming opportunities for rooms or facilities range from $25,000 to over $1,000,000.

Gifts can be in the form of an outright gift of cash, a pledge payable over a period of several years, gifts of stock or real estate, a Charitable Gift Annuity or Charitable Remainder Trust or, under certain circumstances, simply including LPI in your will. The bottom line is that your gift will make a significant difference.

For our donors and supporters who will be 70 1/2 years or older this year, you can still make a gift to LPI from your pension plan. The Pension Protection Act of 2006 allows individuals aged 70 1/2 or older to make gifts up to $100,000 to qualified charitable organizations like ours using funds transferred directly from their IRAs. An IRA gift of $25,000 or more qualifies as a naming opportunity for the Linus Pauling Science Center.

Someone who does give money from their IRA does not have to pay taxes on the amounts transferred. There are other benefits to giving from your IRA. However, this law sunsets on December 31, 2007, so if you are interested in exploring this option please let us know soon!

For more information on how to give to the Linus Pauling Institute from your IRA, how to include the Institute in your will or estate plan, or to find out more about naming opportunities in the Linus Pauling Science Center, please contact me at (541) 231-6751 or by email at scott.palmer@oregonstate.edu.


LPI is grateful for the bequests we have received from the following friends this past year:
Nancy Bradford John Holterhoff
Evelyn Bullock David Holtzman
Matilda Charles Arthur Kahn
Ethel Golder Virginia Martindale
Karla Pepe

Last updated December 2007